Women better at holding investment nerve

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Women investors are more likely than men to hold their nerve than during financial turmoil but are less likely than men to invest overall, according to a new study.

The research, for investment provider Alliance Trust, revealed that women were better at holding their investment nerve and less likely to have crystallised a loss when the market dipped.

Almost half of men (48%) have sold investments at a loss when they have gone down in value to try to avoid losing more money but only 38% of women have done the same.

When asked whether they had stopped or reduced their regular investment payments because the markets had dropped, 17% of men had done so entirely compared to just 12% of women.

Survey Questions:













Sometimes investments go down in value. When this happens, some people decide to cash in their investments at a loss to avoid losing more money. Have you ever sold an investment at a loss?

 

Gender

Total

Men

Women

Yes, within the last year

12%

15%

6%

Yes, within the last 1-2 years

10%

10%

9%

Yes, within the last 3-5 years

13%

12%

14%

Yes, within the last 6-10 years

6%

6%

4%

Yes, over 10 years ago

5%

5%

5%

No

51%

48%

55%

I don’t know

5%

4%

7%

NET: Yes

45%

48%

38%

Source: Alliance Trust / Opinium

 










 

Portfolio value falls 5%

Portfolio value falls 6-10%

Portfolio value falls 11-15%

Portfolio value falls 16%-20%

Portfolio value falls by more than 20%

Men

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women

Men

Women

I would stay put / hold

69%

61%

59%

52%

46%

40%

37%

31%

30%

27%

I would sell my investments

12%

14%

12%

17%

21%

19%

22%

18%

21%

21%

I would buy more investments

10%

12%

14%

14%

16%

18%

20%

21%

21%

22%

I would pause regular contributions

5%

9%

10%

10%

12%

13%

13%

16%

14%

12%

Not sure

11%

15%

11%

17%

12%

21%

15%

26%

20%

28%

Source: Alliance Trust / Opinium 

However, the survey also showed that men have more money invested compared to women and were more likely to invest in the stock market. Some 30% of men in the UK have a stocks & shares ISA compared to just 16% of women.

About 17% of men have a general investment account compared to 10% of women while 19% of men have a SIPP compared to 9% of women. Ownership of cash savings was similar.

Men also have more money invested with more than half of the women who do invest (54%) having less than £20,000 invested, compared to 37% of men.

In contrast, 39% of men have more than £50,000 invested while just 28% of women can say the same.

• Consumer research was conducted by Opinium Research, who surveyed 2,000 UK adults in August. Of these, 730 were investors (defined as having a Stocks & Shares ISA, a general investment account, and/ or a self-invested/ self-managed personal pension).



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